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10th January
2010
written by John

I talk about a tyvek jacket that would be excellent to wear while warming up for a marathon. Sometimes you have to wait a while before the race starts or to get to the starting line. This jacket is excellent because it keeps you dry and warm and it’s cheap. It’s made by www.sportshell.com You can also wear it on your marathon training runs.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
Click here to order theRunning Stretches and tips DVD.

TheRunnersGuide
Marathon Pace Chart

1st January
2010
written by John

My name is John Hopple and welcome to TheRunnersguide.com. I have been running for over 20 years. I ran track and cross country in high school and then went on to be a four time All-American while attending Malone College. After college I competed as a post-collegiate athlete and coached at the high school and college level. I have been very fortunate to be coached and associated with many top coaches in the country. Which includes my college coach Jack Hazen and Joe Vigil who coached 2 Olympic medalists in the 2004 Olympic Games. I have run a 4:09 mile, 29:35 10k and a 2:42 marathon. Currently I am being coached by Matt Woods and training for the masters ranks. I am married and have 2 children who enjoy going to races. I will be sharing marathon training tips to help you with your next marathon.

29th September
2009
written by John

During a recent race after the second mile, my wife and my two young kids were at the corner cheering me on. It was one of those inspiring moments that got me through a bad patch running I was going through. Hearing them yell “Go Daddy we are proud of you” helped me run one of the best times of the summer. So I got to thinking about how I can have my kids and my wife with me when they can’t make a race or if a course is not fan friendly.

So I created a website where you can create a audio file that you can upload to any Ipod or Mp3 player. It’s very simple to work and all you need is your telephone. Here is how it works.

1. Log onto my website and purchase the audio message. Click here.

2. Call the phone number you will receive via email.

3. Leave an inspirational message just like you would on an answering machine.

4. You will receive your message by email to upload to any ipod or mp3 player.

5. For a limited time all my subscribers will receive a 20% percent discount at checkout.

You will receive your audio file within 24 hours so you can listen to it at your next race.If you have any questions or comments about this service please Email me. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John

21st February
2009
written by John

After logging the miles for months preparing for a marathon or a 5k, you want to make sure that your body is fueled properly for race day. Many people have asked me what I eat before a race or workout. First, you want to remember the day before is when you should be focusing on what you are eating. Running any race especially the marathon, you want to make sure you consume foods that are enriched with carbohydrates. Foods like pasta, breads and rice should be on your dinner plate. Make sure you don’t over eat and have that bloated feeling. Try to treat it like any other meal. Also, drinking a lot of water is important. Most of my meals I drink water, because I want to constantly hydrate myself. This will help with your performance if you are consistent.

The morning of the race I wake up about three hours before the race and eat my breakfast. Give your body some time to digest the food so it can be used in your race. If I am running a race distance of 10k or shorter I drink a cup of water and a couple pieces of toast with jelly. Eating fruit, pancakes or anything else that is easy to digest would be great. Stay away from things that have a lot of fat and protein, because it does not digest as well. If I am running a distance longer than a 10k I will wake four to five hours before and have a full breakfast of pancakes, toast and water. The key is eating enough to keep the grum belly away, but not overdoing it either. Practice this routine in other races leading up to your peak race to find out what best works for you. To learn more you can go to diet and nutrition for runners.

Here is a small portion of the Running DVD I created. The video includes 15 stretches that are geared for runners. The Running Video also includes running tips I have learned through the years that have help my development.

Click here to order the DVD.

My own running the past three weeks has gone through a bad patch. I have kept my volume up to around 60, but I have not been able to get in any quality runs. Today I ran my second 5k for the indoor season and ran 16:04 at Kent State University . Overall, I happy about performance after going through these tough three weeks. I will back off the racing and increase my mileage the next few weeks. If you live in Northeast Ohio and you want to improve your running I highly recommend Matt Woods. He works with people of all ability levels and he has been training me for a while. His web address is SportsLab of Real Fitness.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide
Marathon Pace Chart

6th February
2009
written by John

I received an email this past week about running with shin splits and how to get rid of this running injury. This is an injury that many many runners deal with on a regular basis. One reason runners get shin splints is because they overstride, and land heavily on the heel of the shoe with each footstrike. When this happens, the forefoot quickly slaps down to the ground. This force creates an eccentric contraction which leads to muscle soreness and making it tough to run.

How do we get rid of the pain and keep it away? The best thing to do is stop training until the pain goes away. To help speed up the healing process you can take anti-inflammatory meds, icing the shin splint, or light massage. Once the pain is gone the next step is to strengthen the area. First you can walk on your heals for short periods of time. Start with 15 to 30 seconds once a day and gradually add time. You can also sit on a chair with some canned goods in a sock. Place the sock on the toe and gradually lift your toe upward. Do a couple sets of 10 with this motion.

Once you are running again start at 50% of your previous volume and gradually increase your mileage. If possible try not to land on the heel as hard. You can get the feeling of this if you go to a gradual downhill on grass and run briskly down the hill. I would also go to your local running store and make sure you are wearing the appropriate shoe and change out shoes every 300 to 500 miles. Finally, you need to stretch the shin. One stretch is to place a towel on your toe in the sitting position and slowly pull up. Make sure you do not get to the point of pain though. To learn more stretches you can go to Running Stretches and Running Tips DVD.

My own running has gone quite well. I am averaging between 60 to 65 miles a week and doing a couple hard runs each week. I recently ran a Masters PR of 15:49 for 5000 meters at Kent State. I will running an indoor 5000 meter race soon and excited about it.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide
Marathon Pace Chart

24th January
2009
written by John

Do you want to improve your running? Through my years of running I have had numerous people ask me what type of stretches should a runner be doing. So I decided to put together a video of 15 running stretches. I also included 10 running tips to help you run faster. If you would like to learn more go to running stretches and running tips. Here are a few things you will learn on the video:

15 Running Stretches and 10 Running Tips DVD.

* 15 Running Stretches

* 10 Running Tips

* How long to hold a stretch

* What to eat before you race

* How to motivate yourself

* When to replace running shoes

* Healthy eating habits

* Common running mistakes

* How to prevent injuries

* How to improve running form

* and much more!!!

To learn more you can go to Running Stretches DVD.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

9th August
2008
written by John

Once you’ve cleared your schedule and made time to run, your next step is to find a place to do it. Here are some tips for finding the best place to go for your workout.

1. Stay close. Whether you run at a gym or in the great outdoors, you should find somewhere near your home, office, or another convenient location. If you don’t have to go out of your way to run, you’re more likely to actually do it.

2. Mix it up. One challenge many runners face is boredom. You’re more likely to get bored if you run in the same place over and over. If you run outdoors, find several different routes you can take and alternate where you go. If you run indoors, try running on a treadmill where you can see a T.V. rather than a track.

3. Take the right path. More important than where you run is what you run on. The best possible material to run on is soft, but smooth; like a treadmill or an indoor track. If you are running outside, where you run depends on your problems. If you have issues with stress on your knees and other joints, you should avoid concrete because it is very rough on your body. Running on a dirt path is softer and less harsh, but you risk tripping and hurting yourself on uneven terrain.

To learn more you can go to variety to your running workouts or go to my forum and ask a question and I will address it personally.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

3rd August
2008
written by John

A great way to stay motivated as a runner is to participate in races every so often. This helps push you to be better, plus you can meet other runners in the area. Your first race can be intimidating and overwhelming because there’s so much going on. Here are a few tips from expert racers to help you out.

1. Get an official race flyer. If you get your information from another source, there’s a chance you’ll get the wrong info. Having a flyer will ensure you have the right time and place, along with all the other important details.

2. Pack the night before. Many races start very early in the day. Instead of rushing to pack that morning, get your stuff together the night before. This will keep you from forgetting something and will make you less stressed right before the race.

3. Bring safety pins to attach your race tags.

4. Bring toilet paper; you never know if they’ll have it or not.

5. Don’t try new stuff on race day, you’ll probably regret it. Test new shoes and other products during practice first.

6. Thank the race volunteers who help you. You should also consider volunteering at races you’re not running in. It can help you meet people and gain respect from the community.

7. Don’t take a race too seriously. If running stops being fun, you’ll stop wanting to do it.

To learn more you can go to race day preparation or go to my forum and ask a question and I will address it personally.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

19th July
2008
written by John

One of the most important pieces of equipment to a runner is their shoes. Choosing the right running shoes is important for any distance runner. They support your body and keep it safe and healthy while you run. Even if you don’t run that much, you should invest in a good pair of running shoes. We all know that a shoe should feel comfortable, but there are other things you may not think of. Here are a few tips on selecting the right pair.

· Get enough support. A good pair of running shoes should feel snug all around your foot. This means that your whole foot is being supported. If you can’t find a pair of shoes with the right support, buy some orthotic inserts.

· Examine the shoes. Besides trying on the shoes at the store, you should look and feel the shoes as well. Check to see if they feel strong and well made. Also check for padding and other shock absorption factors.

· Get the right size. Many people think about how their arches feel in shoes and totally ignore their toes. To avoid toe damage, get shoes that are half an inch longer than your farthest reaching toe. Also, since your feet spread out as you walk and stand during the day; try to shop for shoes at night when your feet are bigger.

· Don’t use worn out shoes. Shoes eventually lose their ability to absorb shock after about 400 miles. Keep track of your mileage and replace your shoes accordingly. You may need to replace them more often depending on your running style.

To learn more you can go to how to buy running shoes or go to my forum and ask a question and I will address it personally.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

19th June
2008
written by John

While cramping is annoying to many runners, it can be severe enough to stop some people in their tracks. The best way to prevent a cramp is to stop it from happening in the first place. Here are a few tips to prevent getting painful cramps.

Drink lots of water. If I could give any beginning runner one tip, this one would be it. All the sweat you produce when you run is water leaving your body. If you are a heavy sweater, you could lose up to 5% of your body weight on a run, causing painful cramps as well as other problems. Bring water on your runs and make sure to drink it.

Stretch. Don’t skip stretching before and after every run.

Eat right. If you continually get cramps, you may be deficient in potassium, sodium, calcium, or magnesium. Try eating healthier.

Watch for triggers. Not everyone gets cramps for the same reason. Pay attention to what you do and the level of your cramps. You may find you can’t eat too closely to your run, or that something else is increasing your cramps.

Practice deep breathing. Not only will this help you feel better, the more you concentrate on your breathing, the less you concentrate on the pain.

To learn more you can go to diet and nutrition for runners or go to my forum and ask a question and I will address it personally.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.

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