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running tips

23rd April
2011
written by John

The first step you need to make toward achieving success in any running session or any other training program is to start off with a decent warm-up. This warm-up is meant to get your cardiovascular system and body muscles well ready and prepared for the activity ahead. Otherwise, you tire really soon and may experience discomfort, headaches or even run the risk of injury.

Therefore, just like a car, your body needs to be approached properly and introduced incrementally into the exercise. There is no rush here since a proper warm-up does not last that long anyway. Here are 3 things to keep in mind before you break into your running pace:

1- For starters, you should start off by first breathing deeply and preparing your lungs for the exercise. Doing this will also enrich your bloodstream with oxygen which is essential for the exercise.

2- Do some brisk walking, and a couple of quick stretches. However don’t ever stretch a cold body since it may lead to pain or injury. Running Stretches DVD

3- And as you feel your body well warmed and geared up, you can start breaking incrementally into a comfortable running pace. Don’t jump head on from the get go, instead you should opt for a more gentle approach and increase the intensity up incrementally.

For more running tips please Click Here for more information.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run.

Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

16th April
2011
written by John

Here are the 3 things you need to do so you can start a running habit under 4 weeks:

1- Commit your decision on paper:
In order to take yourself seriously, you need to write down you running goals on paper and plan way ahead every running session throughout the upcoming 4 weeks. Doing so will compel your unconscious mind to move toward your desired outcome.

2- Commit to 30 days
The golden rules of building any kind of habit is start now and never deviate. And according to many peak performance experts such as Wyatt Woodsmall and Tony Schwartz, the best time-frame in which you can turn a human activity such as running into a habit is roughly 4 weeks. 4 weeks is not a long time and a small price to pay for the longer term results you will definitely get.

3- Hold yourself accountable
After making the first 2 steps, you need to hold yourself accountable to the training by doing the training no matter what is happening around you. The best way I found to do that is to ask a friend or a family member to hold you accountable for your actions, so whenever you deviate from the course, he or she can help you to get back on track.

However don’t be a perfectionist and try to do everything right from the first go. It’s better to do the right things instead of doing things right, hence you should allow enough wiggle room for error and be gentle on yourself when you do slip and fall back. For more running tips please Click Here for more information.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run.

Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

14th February
2011
written by John

As marathon runners are training hard and in some cases running to raise money for a cause, DonationTo.com makes it very easy for marathon runners to create a donation web-page and accept donations online.

Whether it is running to help fight breast cancer or any other fundraising, DonationTo.com enables users to personalize their page with beautiful images or video to clearly promote their cause. In addition to having a beautiful donation page, users can also keep 100% of all donations collected, regardless if they hit their goal. This unique feature enables marathon runners to fundraise more effectively.

See an example of a DonationTo page here: DonationTo.com/pinkBow
To learn more about how you can create your own DonationTo page visit here: DonationTo.com/Raise-Money-For-Marathon

Happy running and fundraising !!

23rd January
2010
written by John

In this video I talk about the symptoms of over-training and some simple solutions to prevent you from do this before your next marathon race.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
Click here to order the Running Stretches and tips DVD.

TheRunnersGuide
Marathon Pace Chart

17th January
2010
written by John

In this video I talk about the two most important training runs for your marathon training. I discuss how often to do long runs for the marathon and incoporate marathon pace runs. I also go over what you should do on the other days.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
Click here to order the Running Stretches and tips DVD.

TheRunnersGuide
Marathon Pace Chart

6th February
2009
written by John

I received an email this past week about running with shin splits and how to get rid of this running injury. This is an injury that many many runners deal with on a regular basis. One reason runners get shin splints is because they overstride, and land heavily on the heel of the shoe with each footstrike. When this happens, the forefoot quickly slaps down to the ground. This force creates an eccentric contraction which leads to muscle soreness and making it tough to run.

How do we get rid of the pain and keep it away? The best thing to do is stop training until the pain goes away. To help speed up the healing process you can take anti-inflammatory meds, icing the shin splint, or light massage. Once the pain is gone the next step is to strengthen the area. First you can walk on your heals for short periods of time. Start with 15 to 30 seconds once a day and gradually add time. You can also sit on a chair with some canned goods in a sock. Place the sock on the toe and gradually lift your toe upward. Do a couple sets of 10 with this motion.

Once you are running again start at 50% of your previous volume and gradually increase your mileage. If possible try not to land on the heel as hard. You can get the feeling of this if you go to a gradual downhill on grass and run briskly down the hill. I would also go to your local running store and make sure you are wearing the appropriate shoe and change out shoes every 300 to 500 miles. Finally, you need to stretch the shin. One stretch is to place a towel on your toe in the sitting position and slowly pull up. Make sure you do not get to the point of pain though. To learn more stretches you can go to Running Stretches and Running Tips DVD.

My own running has gone quite well. I am averaging between 60 to 65 miles a week and doing a couple hard runs each week. I recently ran a Masters PR of 15:49 for 5000 meters at Kent State. I will running an indoor 5000 meter race soon and excited about it.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide
Marathon Pace Chart

24th January
2009
written by John

Do you want to improve your running? Through my years of running I have had numerous people ask me what type of stretches should a runner be doing. So I decided to put together a video of 15 running stretches. I also included 10 running tips to help you run faster. If you would like to learn more go to running stretches and running tips. Here are a few things you will learn on the video:

15 Running Stretches and 10 Running Tips DVD.

* 15 Running Stretches

* 10 Running Tips

* How long to hold a stretch

* What to eat before you race

* How to motivate yourself

* When to replace running shoes

* Healthy eating habits

* Common running mistakes

* How to prevent injuries

* How to improve running form

* and much more!!!

To learn more you can go to Running Stretches DVD.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

9th August
2008
written by John

Once you’ve cleared your schedule and made time to run, your next step is to find a place to do it. Here are some tips for finding the best place to go for your workout.

1. Stay close. Whether you run at a gym or in the great outdoors, you should find somewhere near your home, office, or another convenient location. If you don’t have to go out of your way to run, you’re more likely to actually do it.

2. Mix it up. One challenge many runners face is boredom. You’re more likely to get bored if you run in the same place over and over. If you run outdoors, find several different routes you can take and alternate where you go. If you run indoors, try running on a treadmill where you can see a T.V. rather than a track.

3. Take the right path. More important than where you run is what you run on. The best possible material to run on is soft, but smooth; like a treadmill or an indoor track. If you are running outside, where you run depends on your problems. If you have issues with stress on your knees and other joints, you should avoid concrete because it is very rough on your body. Running on a dirt path is softer and less harsh, but you risk tripping and hurting yourself on uneven terrain.

To learn more you can go to variety to your running workouts or go to my forum and ask a question and I will address it personally.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

3rd August
2008
written by John

A great way to stay motivated as a runner is to participate in races every so often. This helps push you to be better, plus you can meet other runners in the area. Your first race can be intimidating and overwhelming because there’s so much going on. Here are a few tips from expert racers to help you out.

1. Get an official race flyer. If you get your information from another source, there’s a chance you’ll get the wrong info. Having a flyer will ensure you have the right time and place, along with all the other important details.

2. Pack the night before. Many races start very early in the day. Instead of rushing to pack that morning, get your stuff together the night before. This will keep you from forgetting something and will make you less stressed right before the race.

3. Bring safety pins to attach your race tags.

4. Bring toilet paper; you never know if they’ll have it or not.

5. Don’t try new stuff on race day, you’ll probably regret it. Test new shoes and other products during practice first.

6. Thank the race volunteers who help you. You should also consider volunteering at races you’re not running in. It can help you meet people and gain respect from the community.

7. Don’t take a race too seriously. If running stops being fun, you’ll stop wanting to do it.

To learn more you can go to race day preparation or go to my forum and ask a question and I will address it personally.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

19th June
2008
written by John

While cramping is annoying to many runners, it can be severe enough to stop some people in their tracks. The best way to prevent a cramp is to stop it from happening in the first place. Here are a few tips to prevent getting painful cramps.

Drink lots of water. If I could give any beginning runner one tip, this one would be it. All the sweat you produce when you run is water leaving your body. If you are a heavy sweater, you could lose up to 5% of your body weight on a run, causing painful cramps as well as other problems. Bring water on your runs and make sure to drink it.

Stretch. Don’t skip stretching before and after every run.

Eat right. If you continually get cramps, you may be deficient in potassium, sodium, calcium, or magnesium. Try eating healthier.

Watch for triggers. Not everyone gets cramps for the same reason. Pay attention to what you do and the level of your cramps. You may find you can’t eat too closely to your run, or that something else is increasing your cramps.

Practice deep breathing. Not only will this help you feel better, the more you concentrate on your breathing, the less you concentrate on the pain.

To learn more you can go to diet and nutrition for runners or go to my forum and ask a question and I will address it personally.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.

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