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marathon training

12th April
2008
written by John

Recovery runs are the most important part of your training regimen. The body needs a break from the intense training a distance runner puts it through. The hard workouts provide the stimulus to help you improve. The recovery runs are when you will see those training benefits. Running fast everyday will lead to overtraining, and may cause unwanted injuries. By balancing the volume and intensity of your training you will see your fitness improve.

Recovery run pace will vary from person to person and the event you are training for. The pace of the run is the most important variable that you must control. Many athletes believe they need to run fast everyday. My philosophy is, the slower the better. I have always run slowly on my easy days. You should feel as though you can carry on a conversation with another person and not be laboring at all. If you have a heart monitor try to keep your heart rate between 135 to 150 bpm. Most of my recovery runs I do alone. I recommend you do this so you are not competing with another athlete. If you follow these tips you will see improvement with your race times and feel ready for your next workout. To learn more you can go to why are recovery runs important.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them and I will address them personally and include them in my videos. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

29th March
2008
written by John

I received an e-mail asking me what you can do about the muscle soreness after a tempo run. Here are some ideas to help with recovery after running. First, drink chocolate milk within 30 minutes of your run. Chocolate milk has the 4 to 1 ratio of carbohydrates and protein. This combination helps with the recovery process. I have been using it for years and it does help. Within 2 to 3 hours after your run, it’s good to eat a meal that is loaded with carbos. Some good sources of carbohydrates are like pasta and bread.

Another tip for recovery is to stretch after your run. I normally spend about 15 minutes stretching the major muscle groups. Finally, I take an ice bath. Fill a plastic garbage container with water and ice about waist high. Stand in the container for 5 to 7 minutes. It takes a little getting use to, but it does wonders for your recovery.


If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them and I will address them personally and include them in my videos. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

12th January
2008
written by John

When you start your training for a marathon or if this is the first time running it is very important to make sure you are injury free. If you need to take a few more days off to help your body heal make sure you do it. You must be fresh and ready to go for the upcoming months training. You do not need a nagging injury to prevent you from training.

Your first three to four weeks of running should be very easy. Meaning that you can carry on a conversation with someone while your are running. Many people are excited about getting started and overdue it by doing to much to quick. The rule of thumb is to increase your mileage about 10% each week. Remember it takes the body about
three weeks to adapt to a stress so be patient. In the long run you will be healthier and enjoy the sport more by being injury free. To learn more you can go to

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them and I will address them personally and include them in my videos. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

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