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Archive for April, 2008

26th April
2008
written by John

A question that comes up often is what to eat before running a race. It’s important to eat the right foods at the correct time before you run. Most races are in the morning so you need to make sure you get the right nutrients in your body. After sleeping for eight hours your glycogen stores and blood sugar levels are low. If you go into a race without eating properly, your performance will be hampered. So, on the day of the race you need to top off the glycogen stores and bring your sugar levels up.

I normally eat about three hours before a race. This gives the body plenty of time to digest the food and to bring up those levels of glycogen and sugar. You want to choose slow-release foods that contain carbohydrates and a little bit of protein. Such as toast, cereal with low-fat milk, and fruit. Eat enough to take that hunger edge away, and don’t overdue it. Make sure you take in 300 to 500 calories for your prerace meal. If your body can’t handle solid foods try a sport drink or sports meal replacement meal. Stick with foods that you’re familiar with and never experiment with new foods the day of the race. Once you find what works best for you stick with it. Remember that you prepared for weeks for a race why not go the extra mile and eat right. To learn more you can go to diet and nutrition for runners.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them or go to my forum and I will address them personally. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

18th April
2008
written by John

Over the last few months I have had some great emails from runners asking me how they can improve on their running. I came to realization that it would be best if I take all this info and put it on the web. So I decided to create a running forum where we can share thoughts, ideas and our successes together. In the upcoming months my goal is to have a great resource of information to help us all improve.

In my attempt to start this forum I am going to need your help. If you have any questions go ahead and post them in the forum. Remember, there are no bad questions. Also, if you have any suggestions to make the forum a better community or categories you would like information to be put in, please email them to me. All you need to do is go to The Runners Guide Forum and sign up for an account. After you have an account, go ahead and post a question and I will respond as soon as possible. I hope to hear from you soon and Good Luck with your training.

Click here to enter the forum.

Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

12th April
2008
written by John

Recovery runs are the most important part of your training regimen. The body needs a break from the intense training a distance runner puts it through. The hard workouts provide the stimulus to help you improve. The recovery runs are when you will see those training benefits. Running fast everyday will lead to overtraining, and may cause unwanted injuries. By balancing the volume and intensity of your training you will see your fitness improve.

Recovery run pace will vary from person to person and the event you are training for. The pace of the run is the most important variable that you must control. Many athletes believe they need to run fast everyday. My philosophy is, the slower the better. I have always run slowly on my easy days. You should feel as though you can carry on a conversation with another person and not be laboring at all. If you have a heart monitor try to keep your heart rate between 135 to 150 bpm. Most of my recovery runs I do alone. I recommend you do this so you are not competing with another athlete. If you follow these tips you will see improvement with your race times and feel ready for your next workout. To learn more you can go to why are recovery runs important.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them and I will address them personally and include them in my videos. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

6th April
2008
written by John

As the marathon season comes upon us, it’s important that a marathon taper is part of your training schedule. It’s one of the most overlooked components of marathon training. Most people think you need to continue to train hard leading up to the race. Marathoners think more is better, but in reality doing less will help you achieve your goal. Tapering allows your body to repair muscle fibers that have been damaged during those long runs and intervals. The body during the taper can store more glycogen that will help you finish the 26.2 mile race. It also gives you a mental break from the stress of the hard training you put in.

A marathon tapering program should start three weeks from your marathon. Week one you should drop your overall mileage and long run about 15%. So if your are running 50 miles a week before the taper, that week drop your mileage down to about 42 miles. Continue with your tempo run and or intervals at this point.

Week two you should drop your mileage and the long run another 15%. Your mileage for that week should be 35 miles if you are using the example of 50 miles. During this week and preferably 10 days away from the marathon you should do your last tempo run.

The week of the marathon you should drop another 20% of your original mileage. That means you will run half of the mileage you started out with. All of your runs should be at an easy pace and do not do anything intense the last week. The week before the marathon it’s important that you eat plenty of pasta and drink fluids as often as you can. Enjoy this week because you have trained hard to get to this point and you deserve it. Having a positive attitude and have a great support system makes the whole experience that much better. Good luck and you if you have comments about your race please post them. To learn more you can go to marathon training.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about Email them and I will address them personally and include them in my videos. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

2nd April
2008
written by John

My friends who don’t run ask me if I get hungry during my 20 mile run. I tell them sometimes I do. When I do get hungry on my long run, I suck down something called GU Energy Gel. It’s a small package that has a jelly substance that contains carbohydrates. It helps put off fatigue that usually slows you down during the marathon. It also delivers the complex carbohydrates to muscles as energy.

I try to take in a packet every 3 to 4 miles. I also try to have some water with them so they go down easier. I strongly recommend that if you plan to use the GU packets in the marathon you practice using them on your long runs. You want to make sure your body can handle it because each person is different. You can buy GU Energy Gel online or your favorite running store for about a dollar a packet.

If you have any questions or topics you would like for me to talk about E-mail them and I will address them personally and include them in my videos. Until next time, have a Great Run. Sign up for my newsletter for more tips.
Thanks,
John
TheRunnersGuide

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